Seminars by Humayun Khan: Classical Indian music

Humayun Khan Music
hkmusic37@gmail.com
703-822-3785
humayunkhanmusic.com

Greetings,
Humayun Khan would love to enrich and diversify your curriculum with his college-level seminars. He is an experienced teacher and performer in the classical music traditions of North India and Afghanistan, singing and playing harmonium.

Humayun has offered seminars at the University of Virginia, James Madison University, Bennington College and Montgomery College. (See below for seminar content.) He has also taught in schools and to individuals of all ages. Currently he has 45 private students.

Humayun’s teachers were Ustad Vilayat Khan in India and Ustad Fateh Ali Khan in Pakistan. He has performed throughout the US, Europe, South Asia, and the Middle East, including many intercultural events. As an Afghan-American, he performs and teaches with the goal of “uniting the world through music and culture.”

For a reference, contact Professor Andrew Connell at connelam@jmu.edu. More references are available upon request.

Sample Humayun’s music on his Soundcloud page:

Find more info on his web site: humayunkhanmusic.com

Humayun is available during the 2017-18 academic year to provide half-day and full-day seminars, as well as residencies. He is also available for performance. Contact hkmusic37@gmail.com or 703-822-3785 with your questions and for bookings.

On behalf of Humayun,
Lorie Merrow
Hillcrest Communications
hkmusic37@gmail.com

________________________________
Seminar content

History: Introduction to the history of Classical Indian music
Sargam: Introduction to the notation system
Instruments: Tanpura, Tabla, Harmonium
Aum: Proper technique and intro to voice production
Raga: Melodic structures used to improvise and compose in
Talas: Rhythmic structures and time cycles used to improvise and composed in
Bandish: Combining the above elements together into a composition
Upaj: Spontaneous improvisation

The Residency includes the content above, providing more detail and depth.
It covers the intricacies of Raga, ornamentation, embellishment of musical phrases and concepts of improvisation techniques. It culminates with a final composition leading to a performance.

Seminars by Humayun Khan: Classical Indian music

Humayun Khan Music
hkmusic37@gmail.com
703-822-3785
humayunkhanmusic.com

Greetings,
Humayun Khan would love to enrich and diversify your curriculum with his college-level seminars. He is an experienced teacher and performer in the classical music traditions of North India and Afghanistan, singing and playing harmonium.

Humayun has offered seminars at the University of Virginia, James Madison University, Bennington College and Montgomery College. (See below for seminar content.) He has also taught in schools and to individuals of all ages. Currently he has 45 private students.

Humayun’s teachers were Ustad Vilayat Khan in India and Ustad Fateh Ali Khan in Pakistan. He has performed throughout the US, Europe, South Asia, and the Middle East, including many intercultural events. As an Afghan-American, he performs and teaches with the goal of “uniting the world through music and culture.”

For a reference, contact Professor Andrew Connell at connelam@jmu.edu. More references are available upon request.

Sample Humayun’s music on his Soundcloud page:

Find more info on his web site: humayunkhanmusic.com

Humayun is available during the 2017-18 academic year to provide half-day and full-day seminars, as well as residencies. He is also available for performance. Contact hkmusic37@gmail.com or 703-822-3785 with your questions and for bookings.

On behalf of Humayun,
Lorie Merrow
Hillcrest Communications
hkmusic37@gmail.com

________________________________
Seminar content

History: Introduction to the history of Classical Indian music
Sargam: Introduction to the notation system
Instruments: Tanpura, Tabla, Harmonium
Aum: Proper technique and intro to voice production
Raga: Melodic structures used to improvise and compose in
Talas: Rhythmic structures and time cycles used to improvise and composed in
Bandish: Combining the above elements together into a composition
Upaj: Spontaneous improvisation

The Residency includes the content above, providing more detail and depth.
It covers the intricacies of Raga, ornamentation, embellishment of musical phrases and concepts of improvisation techniques. It culminates with a final composition leading to a performance.

Ali Akbar Khan Library to Open

The world’s greatest single-artist repository of music teaching, the Ali Akbar Khan Library, is now open without charge to all who wish to learn more about one of the subtlest and most beautiful of human art forms, the thousand-year-old tradition of North Indian classical music. It is located at 215 West End Avenue, San Rafael, Californiam with hours from 11 am to 6 pm Monday and Wednesday, 11 am to 9 pm Tuesday and Thursday.
It is as though you could get a painting lesson from Picasso or a class in physics from Albert Einstein. In the past century, the late sarode player Ali Akbar Khan – “Khansahib” – was among the absolute master musicians on the planet. He is the man Yehudi Menuhin said was an “absolute genius…the greatest musician in the world.”
He first came to the United States in 1955 at the invitation of Lord Menuhin, initiating the bridge that would introduce Indian music to the West. In 1967, he founded the Ali Akbar College of Music in Marin County, California, and for the next 40 years he taught six classes a week for nine months a year to what would total around 10,000 students.
Those classes were recorded, either in audio or video. So were 900 concerts. It’s been digitized, organized, and cross-referenced to a fare-thee-well ($375,000 worth of grants and donations).* It is a veritable (and virtual) mountain of musical wisdom, a unique trove of profound teaching that is now accessible to the public. There’s never been a musician’s archive like it.
Introductory examples of Ali Akbar Khan teaching classes is currently available on line at www.aliakbarkhanlibrary.com, but for real access, the true pilgrim will want to go to the Library.
“Introductory examples of Ali Akbar Khan teaching classes is available online at…” because we are up and running.
The brilliant English guitarist Julian Bream visited India and played with Khansahib and said of the experience, “He seemed to me just about the finest musician that I’d ever met in my life…I just admired his mastery. It was above the normal professional mastery that most of us have on the instruments of our choice…his improvisations were so interesting, so fluid, so inventive, so evocative, so exciting, that I felt that this is the way to play music.”
The master tabla player of our time, Zakir Hussain, said of Khansahib that he was “The musician of the century of India…one of those musicians who show up in a blue…year and give the music the nudge it needs to move on to the next level.”
Khansahib’s music lives.

At the Library: Director Mary Khan, 415 454-6372 mary@aacm.org

Press: D. McNally (415) 310 2448. dennismcnally@mac.com

*= Khansahib taught 361 ragas over the years, and from them derived the 7,197 compositions currently in the library; they came at three levels (beginner, intermediate, advanced), and for voice (20 styles, from ancient Dhrupad to Kheyal to Thumri, and 17 more) and instruments (sarode, sitar, bow & flute). The ragas are classified un

Announcing the Launch of a New Journal – Cultural Diversity in China – and call for papers

We are pleased to announce that the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, Göttingen, Germany, and the Center for the Study of Ethnic Cultural Diversity, Beijing, China, have launched a new open access E-journal titled The Journal of Cultural Diversity in China 《中国文化多样性研究》 , published by De Gruyter Open twice a year. Articles will appear simultaneously in English and Chinese. The first issue has appeared online under http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/cdc.2015.1.issue-1/issue-files/cdc.2015.1.issue-1.xml in February, 2015.
The journal aims to include articles concerned with cultural diversity in modern China from a social science perspective, especially sociology and anthropology. General themes to be addressed comprise relations between ethnicity and religion, urbanization of ethnic and religious minorities, transnational aspects of ethnicity, and questions of language, religion, assimilation and nationhood.
Editor-in Chief: Peter van der Veer, Göttingen
Co-Editors:
• HUANG Jianbo黄剑波(Renmin University of China中国人民大学)
• LIANG Yongjia梁永佳(China Agricultural University中国农业大学)
• WU Da巫达(Minzu University of China中央民族大学)
• YANG Der-Ruey杨德睿(Nanjing University南京大学).
Editorial Coordinator: Jie Kang 康婕, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, Göttingen, Germany
Editorial Advisory Board:
• Steven Vertovec, Max Planck Institute, Göttingen, Germany
• Kenneth Dean, National University of Singapore, Singapore
• Bung-Cho Chung, Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea
• Steven Harrell, University of Washington, Washington, USA
• Stephan Feuchtwang,The London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom
• Vincent Goossaert, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CNRS Sorbonne, Paris, France
• Randy LaPolla, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
• Sidney C. H. Cheung, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
• Joseph Bosco, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
• Lizhu Fan Fudan University, Shanghai, P.R. China
• Xiaoyun Li China Agricultural University, Beijing, P.R. China
• Yin Se Chinese Academy of Social Science, Beijing, P.R. China
• Mingming Wang Peking University, Beijing, P.R. China
• Shengmin Yang Minzu University of China Beijing, P.R. China
• Xiaojun Zhang Tsinghua University, Beijing, P.R. China
• Xudong Zhao Renmin University of China, Beijing, P.R. China
• Xiaoyun Zheng Chinese Academy of Social Science, Beijing, P.R. China
• Hong Ding Minzu University of China, Beijing, P.R. China
We invite scholars to submit articles of between 5 -7,000 words written in English or Chinese, with 300 word abstracts in English and Chinese. The submissions will undergo a double-blind peer-review and editorial process. Please note that we ask those who submit in Chinese to also include a two-page English-summary. Please find more details on formatting and submission under http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/cdc

Sahayog Foundation Update

That time of year again: holidays and the end of the year are upon us, and I want to update you all on what has transpired since my last email just before the end of summer.

Our pre-school is going strong. The kids are doing great and enjoying the learning process. The older girls who we are supporting are also doing well in the various schools they are attending. We hope to have one or two more ready for college next summer. One of them has already graduated and wants to learn computers, so we are financing a private tutor from whom she is getting computer lessons so she can compete with the city students who are already very good with computers.

However, the most significant thing that has been happening the last few months with regards to our ability to build a school is that our application for permission from the Indian government to finance the project is proceeding well and has passed a few hurdles. Several of you helped us out financially to further the process right when it was needed the most to get to this point, and I want to thank you all so much for your kindness (I will definitely be sending tax receipts before the end of the year). The person who is handling the process for us in India is an intelligent and trustworthy individual who is committed to helping the unprivileged get educated. We still have a few more hurdles, but I am confident that it will happen, hopefully sooner than later.

Our tractor has continued to be of service to those in need of it. Unfortunately, many cannot afford to pay much so we are often only getting reimbursed for the fuel costs to run it….if that. Nevertheless, it is benefitting many in need, so it is a worthwhile investment for the service it is providing.

There is the need for several more wells, one on our land and one or two in the nearby village. However, the government has prohibited any further digging at this time. I am not sure about all the politics involved, but we hope to be able to get the digging done this coming spring, one way or another.

I plan on returning to our village next May, and will continue from here to move our projects along as much as I can. Anyone feeling inspired to help out before the end of the year will be much appreciated…..:)

I hope that the Christmas holiday provides some peaceful moments for you all and that the new year will bring much health and happiness.

With kind regards, happy holidays, and aloha to you all,
Ramdas
www.sahayogfoundation.org

Siddiq receives award in Patna

Dr. Mohammad Yusuf Siddiq — who has been teaching Arabic at the Gurmani Centre for Languages and Literature at LUMS for the past two years — participated in the International Congress on Bengal Art held at Khuda Baksh Oriental Public Library in Patna, India from February 21-24, 2013, where he was awarded the prestigious Honourary Fellowship of International Centre for Study of Bengal Art by its Board of Trustees.

He also recently published a monumental book (651 pages, in addition to 28 pages introductory pages) in Urdu on the Inscriptions of Bengal published this week by National University of Science and Technology (NUST) Islamabad.

Dr. Siddiq is a great friend of SASA and has attended multiple conferences.