Encounters in the Indian Ocean: Colonial and Postcolonial Imaginaries (ACLA 2017 Panel)

The fluid space of the Indian Ocean and its territorial rims, i.e. Africa, Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, were ‘deterritorialized’ and ‘reterritorialized’ not only by the forces of capital but also by knowledge-power nexus during and after the colonial period. In the age of neoliberal globalism, the story of the Indian Ocean has gained a renewed interest as it reminds us of the greatest mobility and traversal with such an impact that it forces us to rethink how the processes of such encounters operate and what the areas stand for. The story that remains untold is the colonial and postcolonial interactions in this cosmopolitan “interregional arena” (as Sugata Bose refers to it in A Hundred Horizons: The Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire, 2006). Looking at the history of colonial, postcolonial, and interregional encounters will shed light on under-explored areas in postcolonial studies and may possibly reshape our understanding of Africa and Asia. While we know much about Afro-Asian encounters with the West, reading the history as an encounter with the East might provide us with a different set of possibilities of interpretation and analysis (Gaurav Desai – Commerce With the Universe, 2013). The studies of the Indian Ocean worlds, which includes the Bay of Bengal, may even provide “a key to understanding Asia’s future” (Sunil Amrith, Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants, 2013).

This panel seeks papers that explore how the Indian Ocean emerges as a contact zone; how the colonial and postcolonial movements in the Indian Ocean and its rim have been recorded, imagined, constituted and conceptualized, and responded to; how they reveal the story of migration (voluntary and forced), trade, and climate change; how such encounters led to formations of multiple histories and identities; how comparative literary studies opens up the possibilities of rethinking Asias and Africas; and how empire and capital have operated in the Indian Ocean area. We welcome papers that engage with these (and other possible) questions in the Indian Ocean Studies, and accommodate different national, literary, and disciplinary contexts. Papers may either explore literary or visual texts or other forms of textualities. Please submit a 250 word proposal via the American Comparative Literature Association’s website . Please contact Asma Sayed (asayed@ualberta.ca) or Pushpa Acharya (pushpa.acharya@mail.utoronto.ca) for further info.

Call for Paper

Dear Madam/ Sir
It gives us immense pleasure to inform you that School of Extension and Development Studies , IGNOU Delhi will be organizing two days seminar on “Ethnicity and Development in South Asia: Issues and Challenges” 21-22 January, 2016. It is well acknowledged that ethnicity is a stimulant as well as a deterrent to development of the developing countries, particularly South Asia it has stronghold and plays significant role in development.
Research papers are invited for this seminar. Please submit your abstract of the paper before 10th Sept 2015. All details of the forthcoming seminar given at following link.
Seminar Details- http://ignou.ac.in/userfiles/Seminar%20Details.pdf
Registration Form- http://ignou.ac.in/userfiles/Registration%20Form(1).pdf

Seminar Coordinators
Prof. B. K. Pattanaik and Dr. Pradeep Kumar,
School of Extension and Development Studies (SOEDS)
IGNOU, New Delhi

Contact:
Dr. Pradeep Kumar,
School of Extension and Development Studies (SOEDS)
Block- 15 F, Indira Gandhi National Open University,
Maidan Garhi, New Delhi- 110068, India
Email- eadisa.soeds@gmail.com,
Ph. +91-11-2957-1667

Dear Madam/ Sir
It gives us immense pleasure to inform you that School of Extension and Development Studies , IGNOU Delhi will be organizing two days seminar on “Ethnicity and Development in South Asia: Issues and Challenges” 21-22 January, 2016. It is well acknowledged that ethnicity is a stimulant as well as a deterrent to development of the developing countries, particularly South Asia it has stronghold and plays significant role in development.
Research papers are invited for this seminar. Please submit your abstract of the paper before 10th Sept 2015. All details of the forthcoming seminar given at following link.
Seminar Details- http://ignou.ac.in/userfiles/Seminar%20Details.pdf
Registration Form- http://ignou.ac.in/userfiles/Registration%20Form(1).pdf

With regards,

(Pradeep Kumar)
School of Extension and Development Studies (SOEDS)
Block- 15 F, Indira Gandhi National Open University,
Maidan Garhi, New Delhi- 110068, India
Email- eadisa.soeds@gmail.com,
Ph. +91-11-2957-1667

Call for Paper

School of Extension and Development Studies , IGNOU (Delhi) will be organizing two days seminar on “Ethnicity and Development in South Asia: Issues and Challenges” 21-22 January, 2016. It is well acknowledged that ethnicity is a stimulant as well as a deterrent to development of the developing countries, particularly South Asia it has stronghold and plays significant role in development.

Research papers are invited for this seminar. Please submit your abstract of the paper before 10th Sept 2015. All details of the forthcoming seminar given at following link.

Seminar Details- http://ignou.ac.in/userfiles/Seminar%20Details.pdf

Registration Form- http://ignou.ac.in/userfiles/Registration%20Form(1).pdf

Seminar Coordinators
Dr. Pradeep Kumar and Prof. B. K. Pattanaik
School of Extension and Development Studies (SOEDS)
IGNOU, New Delhi

Contact:
Dr. Pradeep Kumar,
School of Extension and Development Studies (SOEDS)
Block- 15 F, Indira Gandhi National Open University,
Maidan Garhi, New Delhi- 110068, India
Email- eadisa.soeds@gmail.com,
Ph. +91-11-2957-1667

Reacting to the Past: India on the Eve of Independence

Defining a Nation: India on the Eve of Independence, 1945 (W.W. Norton, 2014) is set at Simla, where the British viceroy has invited leaders of various religious and political constituencies to work out the future of Britain’s largest colony. Will the British transfer power to the Indian National Congress, which claims to speak for all Indians? Or will a separate Muslim state—Pakistan—be carved out of India to be ruled by Muslims, as the Muslim League proposes? And what will happen to the vulnerable minorities—such as the Sikhs and untouchables—or the hundreds of princely states? As British authority wanes, smoldering tensions among Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs increasingly flare into violent riots that threaten to ignite all India. Towering above it all is the frail but formidable figure of Gandhi, whom some revere as an apostle of non-violence and others regard as a conniving Hindu politician.

Ainslie Embree’s game covers the struggle to reconcile religious identity with nation building—perhaps the most intractable and important issue of the modern world. Texts include the literature of Hindu revival (Chatterjee, Tagore and Tilak); the Koran and the literature of Islamic nationalism (Iqbal); and the writings of Ambedkar, Nehru, Jinnah, and Gandhi.

More info at link to registration at: https://reacting.barnard.edu/uo-2014

CFP for SASA 2014, Study Abroad Programs in South Asia

The hosting school for SASA 2014 has a summer project in Maharashtra for undergraduates. Students can receive academic credit in several different disciplines while doing community service work in Westminster’s adopted village. Programs of this sort can be an invaluable life experience for students and a powerful boost to South Asian Studies programs at the home institution. We are looking for panelists who can discuss the various pros and cons of such programs and share their knowledge of how to best manage such programs. Please contact William Vanderbok (bill@sasia.org) if you are interested in participating.